Book reviews!
A COLLECTION OF ESSAYS EDITED BY MARIAM KHAN
-review by Lola

Okay. This is the most interesting, hardcore, unapologetically feminist books I've read this year. If I could give one reading recommendation here it is!

The essays are fiery and burning with anger and frustration at the patriarchy and the oppression of White Feminism, but also full of love for Islam and the empowerment it helps fuel, though complex and full of nuance. 

Yassmin Midhat Abdel-Magied writes in her essay: 

'Life was easier before I was woke,' that 'being among peers asks us instead to delve into the granularity of our experiences as Muslim women beyond the obvious'.

 

This means the essays are full of depth and diversity, so spellbinding I couldn't put it down. Don't just take my word for it, read it. 

This book is a collection of Nancy Fraser's essays on her (very valuable) thoughts about the transformations of feminism since the 1970's.

For me, her most interesting points are made in chapter 3 on "dependency" and welfare, and then her arguments for a modern and socialist approach to feminism, which she outlines in chapter 6.

This is not a quick or easy read, but I definitely recommend at least reading those two chapters. Fraser's arguments are important and interesting contributions to conversations about neoliberalism and feminism's place in challenging it!

Something I've learnt and will remember from the book is Fraser's "universal caregiver" idea which suggests that we assume that people have caregiving responsibilities and then form policies, workplaces, etc. which have to be mindful of them! I think this is a really important idea, for all sorts of adults who have to both work for money and care for relatives. 

FORTUNES OF FEMINISM FROM STATE-MANAGED CAPITALISM TO NEOLIBERAL CRISIS
-review by Eloise
I MAY DESTROY YOU
PRODUCED BY MICHAELA COEL

Michaela Coel does it again; producing a hauntingly hilarious dark comedy. As a feminist you will get chills because you feel seen, not targeted.

The series follows Arabella, a writer working on an overdue draft for her second book, but her life collapses after she is drugged and raped on a night out. Coel creates a frightening contrast between Arabella's behaviour in the public eye, and the trauma that consumes her.

The series explores other cases of sexual harassment which are less linear and forces the audience to ask disturbing, but necessary, questions. These side plots teach us about our hypocrisies as we see Arabella's blindness to her's.

Visually, the show is stunning. Moving between Italy and London, the fight to be accomplished in the big city, and young and free in Italy with her romantically destructive love interest, demonstrates Arabella's fight to just be.

Another feature which I adored was the use of costume. Arabella's emotional change would correlate with the colour and style of her hair, something many women can relate to, but more so black women. The show features gay black men, and a gay transgender man whilst it centres around a black woman - you need to hear the voices of the black community, so you need to watch I May Destroy You.

-review by Saja
PLUS!
a special series review
MORE TO COME!
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